Posted on Leave a comment

Tutorial: Reusable Handkerchiefs Made from Recycled Fabric – Part 1 of 2: Jersey (Knit) Fabric

Today, I'm starting with the easiest of the 2 types of fabrics to make reusable tissues, without spending a penny or using any new resources. You can use clothes that are stained or worn in places to cut your handkerchiefs into. You only need sharp scissors and a ruler to make them!

Jersey knit fabric: how to recognize it?

  • It is expandable
  • When you look at it closely, you can see the knitting pattern (see image opposite).
  • When cut, it does not unravel (apart from a few exceptions)
  • Cut edges will tend to roll

Examples of items made from jersey knit:

  • Most stretch sweaters, polo shirts and t-shirts
  • The leggings
  • Some dresses, especially for children

Choosing your fabric :

Among your used clothes, prefer a rather thin fabric, because some thicker fabrics are less easily manipulated to blow your nose or clean the inside of the nostril.

Likewise, feel free to rub your nose on it to test the softness. Think about the last time you had a cold and how your sensitive nose didn't want anything rough to touch it... Today's good news: the more worn the fabric, the softer it will be, in most cases! 🙂

The making :

Cut approximately 8” by 8” (20cm by 20cm) squares from your fabric, avoiding seams and other double layers.

You can use a tissue paper as a cutting template

TADAAAA!
That's it!!
Beautiful reusable tissues in one easy step, reminding you of your favorite clothes!

The only disadvantage of this type of handkerchief is their tendency to roll at the edges. But honestly, it's not that terrible. These are definitely my favorite handkerchiefs. I admit I eliminated the others with sewn edges.

If you have what it takes to machine sew, follow the next tutorial, which will talk about making your handkerchiefs in woven fabric.

Handkerchiefs made from old leggings

Other articles on the subject:

Tutorial: Reusable Tissues Made from Recycled Fabric - Part 2 of 2: Woven Fabric
Tutorial: making reusable tissue boxes

To respond